I'LL BELIEVE IN ANYTHING

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Hey. I'm John Coates.
I work at SoundCloud, marketing our premium services.

I post/comment on anything I find interesting. That usually means marketing, sales, management, and entrepreneurship. I am also an audiophile, outdoors guy, beer geek (my videos: Beer O'Clock) and like to go really fast on skis and bicycles.

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Est. Nov. 15, 2007
Wed Mar 12
You mean the generation that paid three times as much for college to enter a job market with triple the unemployment isn’t interested in purchasing the assets of the generation who just blew an enormous housing bubble and kept it from popping through quantitative easing and out-and-out federal support? Curious.

When comments are better than the article, Atlantic edition (“The Cheapest Generation: Why Millennials aren’t buying cars or houses, and what that means for the economy”)

THIS

(via bbbrad)

(Source: bostonreview, via matthewhayles)

Sat Mar 1
I’d come all the way from New York to eat in Toronto? Well, actually, yes, I had. Toronto’s Ethnic Buffet - NYTimes.com
Fri Feb 28
Wed Feb 26
From the sign-up screen, with its gently rounded font and frequent, trust-building use of the word “you,” Beats Music is designed to resemble a sentient being. Computer Love: Beats Music Wants To Be Your Everything : The Record : NPR
Thu Feb 20
The best comparison for Google seems to me not Microsoft in the 1980s but General Electric in the late 19th century – the age of electrification. Like GE, Google is a multifaceted industrial enterprise riding a wave of technology with an uncanny ability not only to invent far-reaching products but also to produce them commercially. Ways of thinking about Google — Benedict Evans
Mon Feb 17
Fri Feb 14
The problem is, this sort of ignorance and misunderstanding is often how we get true disruption - people are so ignorant that they don’t know something can’t be done and won’t work, so they go and do it, and it works. Ignorance — Benedict Evans
Fri Jan 24
Wed Jan 22
It’s become fashionable, he said, to talk about something called pinpin korori, a brutal but almost comic way of describing an active life followed by sudden death. “Drop down dead,” he laughed. “That’s a good way of saving on medical bills.” Then he paused to reflect. “After all, we don’t want to be a burden on the youngsters.” I think my grandfather did the best he could at this because he wanted it that way. He cared that much about everyone around him over himself. Goodbye Grandpa Art. I will miss your example. “How Japan stood up to old age” - FT.com